Animal Abuser Turns Pro Player

Ishmael Zamora. Remember that name. We may see it in a future headline in connection with homicide or rape.

In August 2016, a video surfaced showing Zamora brutally kicking and beating his dog mercilessly with a belt. A wideout for Baylor at the time, Zamora was charged with misdemeanor animal abuse. He was suspended for three games. Additionally, he was forced to pay a citation (only $500) and complete 40 hours of community service plus an anger management course. His dog was rehomed.

Zamora told the judge he was working with a trainer and trying new potty training methods. What the hell kind of misinformed, atrocious, and heartless training methods does this supposed trainer encourage? Who is this trainer? Seriously. I have done many searches, read through numerous articles, no trainer is ever named.

As a result of the animal abuse charges, Zamora wasn’t invited to the NFL Combine last February. Despite this, Zamora opted to enter the draft but went undrafted. A few days ago, the Oakland Raiders picked up the undrafted free agent.

Once again, the NFL proves that they don't care about a player's character on and off the field.

Take the NFL out of it, let's look at what we do know. Animal abusers are five times more likely to commit violent crimes against people. The following facts (an excerpt from this article HERE) should not be taken lightly - if not for the animals - than for the innocent individuals that may fall victim.

  • The FBI sees animal cruelty as a predictor of violence against people and considers past animal abuse when profiling serial killers.
  • National and state studies have established that from 54 to 71 percent of women seeking shelter from abuse reported that their partners had threatened, injured or killed one or more family pets (Anicare Model workshop, Tacoma, 2004. Created in 1999, the AniCare Model of Treatment for Animal Abuse treats people over 17 by bringing abusers and animals together. A companion program treats children.)
  • In assessing youth at risk of becoming violent, the U.S. Department of Justice stresses a history of animal abuse.
  • More than 80 percent of family members being treated for child abuse also had abused animals. In two-thirds of these cases, an abusive parent had killed or injured a pet. In one-third of the cases, a child victim continued the cycle of violence by abusing a pet.

"One of the most dangerous things that can happen to a child is to kill or torture an animal and get away with it." ~Anthropologist Margaret Mead

While torturing an animal and receiving zero consequences is incredibly troubling, children are also observing how we react - and society reacts as a whole - to events and circumstances. What children see is the NFL continuing to allow teams to fill their rosters with criminals - charges ranging from disorderly conduct and DUIs to murder and sexual assault.

At what point will the NFL begin to take responsibility for our future generations and establish a level of integrity and ethical standards for pro players? 

***I found the picture of Zamora's dog HERE. While there may have been photos of his pet on IG, there are no pictures posted at this time.